In  3–5 complete sentences, thoroughly explain Dr. King’s main idea in this  section and what specific details develop it. Provide at least two specific examples from the text to support your analysis of the main idea and how it’s developed. In  3–5 complete sentences, thoroughly explain how Dr. King develops the  claim that racial injustices must be uncovered to be healed. Which  sentences support the claim? Provide at least two specific examples from the text to show how the claim is developed and supported. In  3–5 complete sentences, thoroughly explain what effect the order of  ideas in paragraphs 9 and 10 have on the meaning of the text. Why does  Dr. King make his points in this order? What is the effect? Provide at least two specific examples from the text to support your answer. ——————————————— Write a thesis statement in response to the following prompt. Prompt:  Read the letter to the editor ‘I, Too, Have a Dream.’ How does the  writer use structure and language to persuade her readers and support  her feelings about immigration? Dear Editor, I  have never taken the time to write a letter to the editor, but  something happened that lit a fire in me. Last week, as my best friend  Areliss and I headed to class, a group of college protesters blocked our  path. Their signs read ‘GO HOME’ and ‘ILLEGALS LEAVE.’ They shouted,  ‘Send them home!’ These protesters couldn’t have known what Areliss felt  as they shouted and waved pamphlets in our faces like tattered flags.  But, I know their words were bullets to Areliss’s heart. I wanted to  fire back to the protestors: Where are your ancestors from? Areliss  came to the United States illegally, but she didn’t do it  intentionally. She was a baby. Her parents, seeking a better life,  failed to follow the established immigration procedure, and they slipped  into our country undetected. Once here, they raised Areliss, who would  grow up never knowing any other home but America. Under DACA  (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals), Areliss has been granted the  temporary opportunity to remain here while she completes her college  education. DACA ensures, at least for a while, that she will not be  deported to a country she has never visited in her entire life. The  term ‘DREAMers’ refers to an act that would have protected these  immigrant children if they attended college or served in the military.  The DREAM Act did not pass, but its name has remained. DACA recipients  have a dream: they dream that their lifelong contribution to the United  States will one day be recognized, and they will be permitted to stay in  the country they have always called home. Now, DACA is ending.  Those who oppose DACA say it encourages illegal activity, weakens our  borders, and goes against the Constitution. I understand their concerns.  In an era of heightened security, we must do our utmost to keep this  great nation safe. That includes establishing a healthy monitoring  system for immigration. But, those who oppose DACA, who wield  protest signs and who want to build walls, have never felt the dreaded  doom of deportation. They forget that our long and colorful history has  been built by many immigrants—including the immigrants who fought for  and founded our country. They forget that Lady Liberty stands as a  beacon, asking for the tired, the poor, and the huddled masses yearning  to breathe free. We have a responsibility to them. To send DREAMers away is to deny that responsibility. Programs like DACA exist to keep the American dream alive. Yes,  Areliss is a DREAMer. But I, too, have a dream. My dream is that DACA  will be reinstated. My dream is that Areliss will be invited to stay in  the country she has known as home since she was a baby and live out her  dreams in the country she loves. Sincerely, Brittany Taylor